King's Day 2014

Submitted by hadrian on Sat, 04/26/2014 - 00:00

Today, a day before Willem-Alexander's actual birthday, is king's day in the Netherlands. I'm not exactly sure why Sunday is so inappropriate for a king's day (or queen's day) but my assumption is that the royal house is still god-fearing or likes to pretend to be. Idiots.... Woops, there I go. Let me explain what was wrong with saying "idiots."

Wilders and Fascism

Submitted by hadrian on Sat, 03/15/2014 - 00:00

And of course it happens again. Elections are due in a few days and the media are filled with mentions of the escapades of and around Wilders. A few days ago a Fouad Sidali, a politician for the Labour Party, compared Wilders to Hitler. A harsh comparison in any case and it was quickly repealed. Within the day Wilders responded by saying that: "One should be able to say anything as long as it does not call for violence.

First response to the 1918 constitution of the SFSR

Submitted by hadrian on Tue, 03/04/2014 - 00:00

One of the greatest tragedies in the history of the world is the failure of the Russian October Revolution. As so many revolutions, it started in an attempt to regain freedom from oppression but only turned another group into an oppressor. Another revolution with such a terrible outcome was the first French revolution. The Russian revolution was also a revolution which saw the quick rise of a series of worker's councils and organisation of the country under these councils. One of the best-known quotes of Lenin was: `All power to the Soviets!'

Humanities and Self-Worth

Submitted by hadrian on Mon, 02/24/2014 - 00:00

As a student of the humanities I'm well aware of the fact that I'll probably not land a job in the field I've studied for. The demand for students of English isn't particularly high even in a globalizing world where English forms the most important language. The same is definitely also true for students of many other fields in the humanities.

Why I Read what is Shocking

Submitted by hadrian on Fri, 01/31/2014 - 13:40

Ever since I was in the final years of high school I started choosing books about shocking topics. One of the first of these was A Long Way Gone by Ishmael Beah where he describes the experiences of a child soldier in Sierra Leone, based on his personal experiences. More recently I read Hannah Arendt's The Origins of Totalitarianism, a political-philosophical account of the totalitarian governments that have ruled in Germany and Bolshevik Russia.

And I'm Back

Submitted by hadrian on Thu, 01/23/2014 - 00:00

The website has been off-line for almost a full month because of my moving to another place. I had hoped I would have a stable internet connection within a few weeks but, alas, they kept me waiting for a full month.

What have I been working on in the mean-time:

Why open source is great: pdf on ereaders

Submitted by hadrian on Sun, 12/15/2013 - 00:00

I have recently come into possession of the Kobo Glo, an e-reader with support for epub, txt, some other common formats and, so they say, pdf. Although I'm very happy with reading epubs I am quite discontented with the way it handles pdf files. From what I've read and heard it is, however, not the only device which lacks decent pdf support. The problem is with the fact that one needs to zoom in to be able to read any text from a PDF file and, consequently, needs to continuously scroll from left to right in order to be able to read which, on an e-reader, is quite slow.

Poetic License

Submitted by hadrian on Thu, 12/12/2013 - 00:00

Poetic license is the right, for a poet, to be a d**k to language. At least, that's how I usually explain it. This means we poets are allowed to twist, maim, or completely ignore the normal rules of grammar. Poetic license, however, extends farther than just the rules of grammar and also includes distortion of actual facts in its description as well as putting the rules of poetry itself into a little corner and let it cry.